Gift Ideas That Give Back

Have you already started your holiday shopping? How about buying meaningful gifts that will do more than just delight your recipient and actually give money back to those less fortunate? Here are a few ideas:

Fire Dept. Coffee

Founded by firefighters, Fire Dept. Coffee offers a variety of roasts and blends for java lovers. In addition to a special Christmas Blend, the company also offers spirit blends, like Bourbon-Infused Coffee and Rum-Infused Coffee, and a percentage of each order supports firefighter and military charities to give back to hardworking servicemen.

ONEHOPE Wine

You honestly can’t beat the gift of booze, and this bottle of cabernet helps fund Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) therapy for children with autism.

Love Your Melon Pom Beanie

Love Your Melon donates 50% of its profits to support pediatric cancer research and families affected by cancer.

Cuddle+Kind Aspen the Penguin

Cuddle+Kind partners with hunger organizations around the world to give meals to children. Your purchase of this precious penguin provides 10 meals to children in North America and around the world.

Adornia Lariat Necklaces

You may have seen some of your favorite celebs sporting these necklaces. There’s a lot to love about these lariat necklaces. They are available in a variety of styles, including 14K yellow gold plated silver, rose gold plated silver and 925 sterling silver, and feature inspirational words like Love, Hope, Woke, Boss, Soul and XO. Best yet, the company donates 10 percent of sales to a different women-centric charity each month.

Original Grain Watch

For the rugged guy who considers himself a bit of a maverick, consider an Original Grain timepiece. As part of their “Barrel Collection,” the brand has released two lines of handcrafted wooden watches using repurposed wood from American Oak bourbon barrels, as well as sustainably sourced materials. Thanks to a partnership with non-profit Trees for the Future, a tree is planted in Senegal for each hardwood-and-stainless-steel watch sold.

 

What to Look for When Signing Your First Lease

Whether you’re living solo for the first time or prepping for an apartment or home rental with your new roommates, your first lease is an important milestone. Before you sign on that dotted line, make a list and check it twice. Use these tips to make sure you’re well informed before you sign your lease and take responsibility for your new rental.

1. Do your research

Treat your commitment to renting a property in the same way you would carefully consider buying an expensive appliance or a new car: do your research. Look for online reviews from previous renters attached to the property profile in Google or on other social media platforms like Facebook. Search under either the landlord’s name or the name of the property company or apartment complex to find reviews in Yelp. You can even dig up complaints filed with the Better Business Bureau. Hopefully, you are working with a RealtorⓇ who can help you with all of this.

2. What are the lease terms?

Even if you and your prospective landlord have previously discussed that your lease will be a year long or month-to-month, make sure the lease term you’re expecting is the one that’s indicated on the lease itself. Whatever the terms are on the lease are the ones that you’re formally agreeing to, so you’re going to want more than just verbal confirmation.

3. What are the policies around breaking the lease early?

Obviously you’re not renting an apartment with the expectation that you’ll need to break your lease early, but life doesn’t always go exactly as planned and it’s possible that you will need to move out before the end of your lease term. Just in case, make sure you know what the policies around breaking a lease early are before you sign, particularly whether it is allowed and what the penalties are. While many landlords do allow early release of the lease if necessary, there may be a fine attached or you may be required to forfeit your security deposit.

4. Be Clear about Maintenance Responsibilities

Understand and document what your responsibilities are in terms of maintenance and who you should call in case of an emergency. When you move in, the landlord should document the condition of the property—if there is pre existing damage, insist that it’s recorded accurately before you accept the keys. Check all the appliances, door locks, and plumbing, and if anything needs attention, require that it be addressed now so you don’t end up paying for it later.

If your landlord doesn’t supply a checklist to verify the current condition of the property when you sign the lease, supply one yourself. There are several free templates online that you can use to document the condition of the property and ask your landlord to co-sign. If you a working with a RealtorⓇ, he or she will provide you with one.

5. How is rent paid?

Every landlord or management company has their own way of accepting rent payments. While in an ideal world you’d be able to just easily pay your rent online every month, it’s possible that you’ll need to drop off a check somewhere or mail it to a specific location.

6. When is rent due?

Most rents are due on the first of every month, but according to what it says in your lease, you may have some flexibility, especially if you have to mail a check somewhere. See if there’s a grace period on rent payments, such as three or five days from the first of the month. While chances are it will just be due on the first, it doesn’t hurt to find out if there’s a little wiggle room.

7. What are the move-in fees?

In addition to your first month’s rent, you may have other required fees due prior to move-in, including last month’s rent, a security deposit, administrative fees, elevator rental fees, or other specific move-in related costs. Check on what these are so that you can make sure you’re not hit with any surprises when moving day comes around.

The more you know about questions to ask before signing a lease, the better protected you’ll be against any surprises or upsets once the lease starts.

 

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Source: www.moving.com

 

 

Is There a Shift in Perceptions of the Housing Market?

For the past five quarters, the majority of Americans said their housing markets were overheating. Now, in the fourth quarter, 75 percent of Americans say their local housing market is starting to cool, according to Value Insured’s Q4 2018 Modern Homebuyer Survey. Homeowners in California, Colorado, Texas, and Washington are most likely to say their local market is starting to cool off.

The survey “revealed some concerning evidence about the changing psychology of the housing market,” says Robert Shiller, a housing economist. “We will be watching these numbers as they unfold over the future.”

Seventy-two percent of Americans and 78 percent of “urban residents” say home prices are still too high. Urban homeowners blame “flippers and speculative investors” and “wealthy transplants from more expensive housing markets” for inflating their local home prices to unsustainable levels, according to the report.

Some home buyers may hit the pause button to see what happens in the housing market. Fifty-nine percent of interested home buyers (which includes first-time and move-up buyers) say they plan to wait for a “meaningful correction” before they buy. Fourteen percent say they plan to not buy at all until a correction occurs.

Several markets are seeing home prices slow. Value Insured’s report notes that the fastest drops in home prices have been happening in Seattle, and North Texas has seen some of its largest sales declines in seven years.

“Buyers have switched from ‘hoop jumpers’ to bargain-hunter mode,” says Joe Melendez, CEO and founder of Value Insured.

 

Source: Realtor.com

 

8 Best Upgrades to Personalize Your New Home

Before you move into your new house, you may want to make upgrades. These add value to your investment, improve your home’s function and allow you to express your personality. Plus, making upgrades before you move in reduces inconvenience later. Consider the following upgrades to make your new house feel like home.

Enhance the Kitchen

Quality kitchen upgrades ensure the room meets your family’s needs, and add value to your home. Consider several changes that improve the quality and function of your kitchen:

  • Get high-end, energy- or water-saving appliances.

  • Lower the bar counter from 42 to 36 inches so it’s more accessible.

  • Install quartz countertops.

  • Add lighting under the counters.

  • Choose matching fixtures and hardware.

Worried about staying on budget while renovating the most expensive room in the house? According to HomeAdvisor’s Kitchen Cost Guide, it costs the average homeowner between $12,500 and $33,500 for a full kitchen remodel.

Redo the Flooring

It’s definitely easier and more affordable to upgrade a house’s flooring before you arrange all the furniture. Consider stain-resistant carpeting in high-traffic areas, or install hardwood in connected rooms for a sleek appearance.

Update the Bathroom

Spruce up a bathroom already in the house or add an additional bathroom before your move. When renovating a bathroom, consider your current and future needs, such as your family size or entertaining habits. Several possible changes include:

  • Install a double sink.

  • Install a walk-in shower or Jacuzzi tub.

  • Choose decorative shower, floor or wall tile.

  • Customize the lighting or fixtures.

  • Hang extra shelves for storage.

Bring in New Cabinetry

Before you unpack all your possessions, install new cabinetry that helps you get and stay organized. The kitchen and bathroom cabinets have a big effect on your home’s function and appearance. Choose cabinet finishes and designs that match your personal style and color scheme. You can hang the old cabinets in the garage or attic to expand your storage space.

Update Electrical Wiring

Older houses may have outdated wiring, or you may find that you need additional outlets in certain rooms. Walk through your house, visualize how you will use each room and plan any electrical wiring updates. With help from an electrician, you can add outlets in the living room to accommodate your gaming systems or wire the den ceiling for a new fan.

Wire for Internet Service

Improve security and speed in your new home with wired internet throughout the house. It allows you to install and use a variety of electronics, including security cameras, in any room. Full-house wired internet also prevents outside users and hackers from accessing your network and potentially harming your family.

Add Lots of Storage

Getting extra storage throughout your house before you move helps you completely unpack and organize your home the way you want. The price of installing a new closet is about $1,800, as found on HomeAdvisor. Choose from a variety of cabinet types, shelving, and overhead storage designs and materials that match your needs and preferences.

Transform the Laundry Room

While you probably plan to use your laundry room primarily for laundry, you may wish to transform it into a functioning pantry, drop zone or mudroom. Rearrange the washing machine and dryer hookup to make room for pantry storage. Consider adding a bench and hooks for shoes, backpacks and umbrellas, too.

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Source: Rismedia

 

 

The Essentials Checklist for Newly Married Homeowners

Life does not end right after the wedding. In fact, it’s when the marriage life begins. Moving to a new home with your partner sounds exciting and fun. At the same time though, this chapter opens up to a whole new array of responsibilities and worries. Don’t fret too quickly as you are not alone to fulfill these. In this article, we will list down five essentials that newly married homeowners should keep in mind.

1. Set Up Electricity Line

A home may not be functional without electricity. At least this is considering that we live in a modern day’s world. When moving to a new home, do not forget to check your electricity connection and billing. This should be under your name and not anybody else’s. Otherwise, you might be connected to illegal electricity lines. Also check indoor and outdoor electric cables and make sure they are all safe and organized.

2. Check Water Pipes

Peek under the basins. Water faucets must be clean and unclogged. The water pipes must not be rusty and dirty, whether the house is new or abandoned for quite a long time. Newly wed homeowners must also check the water pumps and the disaster recovery solutions to keep water running. There must be no leaks in machineries to prevent high costs and conserve water diligently. A wise move is to ask around and survey about plumbing before finally settling in.

3. Move Important Appliances In

For most couples, watching TV or movies is one of the common bonding activities together. The television set must be an essential part of the home. You can have more units depending on the necessity. The washing machine, refrigerator, oven, water heater, clothes dryer, and food processors are some of the other examples.

Apart from those, there are appliances that you might not want to share. For instance, sharing an only computer or only one telephone may be the cause of a dispute. In this case, buying another one of the same appliance would be most ideal.

4. Kill and Prevent Bugs

Bugs and pesky insects are troublesome in any home. They are the least a newlywed couple wants to distract them in their honeymoon stage. To be sure, knowing ways on how to kill these unfriendly tiny organisms is to set up ways on baiting them. For example, a good way for termite control is to install baiting and monitoring stations to have them hooked and never come back.

5. Be Accountable

There should be a separate list of chores for the wife and the husband to avoid disputes. For sure, there are a lot of things to do and manage in a new home. As well, misunderstandings might arise when these chores are not designated and delegated properly. It is very important to be held accountable to certain tasks as this will impact every decision to be made at home. Familiarize yourself with each other’s moods. As people say, you don’t really know the person you are marrying into unless you stay with the person under one roof. Establish commitments and be accountable for them.

Conclusion:

When moving to your home as newly married homeowners, there are a countless number of tips that are essential to living together peacefully. These five things are only basic. Keep in mind that changing of door locks should be the first thing to do when you get inside the house. Also be reminded to taxes to file for real estate and consistently check for house maintenance to prevent high costs to pay later on.

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Source:  Julianne Hernandez @RealtyTimes

How to Make Your House a Smart Home

One way to build out a smart home is to buy lots of components—sensors, smart bulbs, security cameras, speakers, and whatnot—and connect them all to a hub that helps them communicate with each other and with you, via your smartphone. But let’s be real: That can involve spending a lot of money and investing a lot of time. And for some people, it’s just overkill. If your wants and needs are simpler, just a few relatively inexpensive products will deliver most of the conveniences a high-end smart home can deliver, and on a much more modest budget.

And if you make sure those smart home products are compatible with each other, you’ll build a solid foundation that you can expand over time. The key is knowing which smart home products don’t depend on a smart home hub to operate. While hubs offer advantages—the most important of which is having a single user interface to control everything—they’re not always essential. One thing you must have, however, is a good wireless router—ideally one that can reach all corners of your home.

Here some of the a few common ways you can build a hub-free smart home system.

Smart lighting

For most people interested in living in a smart home, lighting is the entry point. Many smart lighting systems work perfectly well without a central hub and are still capable of interacting with other smart home elements. Some bulbs communicate over Wi-Fi, while some others communicate via the Bluetooth radio in your smartphone. You can control any of these smart bulbs with an app on your smartphone or tablet, which you can also use to program lighting scenes and schedules.

If most of your home’s lighting is in the ceiling and controlled by a switch on the wall, you might be better served by replacing those dumb switches with smart switches and dimmers, instead. That’s because a smart bulb becomes dumb the instant you turn off the switch controlling it.

If you use lamps for most of your lighting, a smart plug such as the Wemo Mini will enable you to turn the lamp on and off—and dim its dumb light bulb—with a smartphone app.

Smart speakers

What’s more convenient than pulling out your smartphone to dim the lights on movie night? Saying “dim the lights” and having a smart speaker linked to your smart lighting do it for you. The Amazon Echo series and Google Home series are the market leaders in this space. And while Amazon has held the lead for the past few years—it has a much larger installed base, has enjoyed much broader support, and had the only smart speakers with displays for a time—Google is coming on very strong. You’ll increasingly find the two companies’ digital assistants—Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant—in unique third-party products as well.

Smart thermostats

Few smart home devices can match a smart thermostat ability to deliver both comfort and cost/energy savings. These devices go far beyond establishing a heating and cooling schedule based on when you anticipate being home to enjoy those benefits. They can detect when you’re home and when you’re away, so that your HVAC system operates only when it’s needed.

The latest trend on this front is to equip thermostats with sensors that you can put in the rooms you occupy most frequently, so that the thermostat operates on the basis of where you are in the house, instead of triggering heating and cooling cycles based on the thermostat’s location, which is typically in a hallway you only ever pass through.

Home security cameras

A quality home security camera will enable you to keep a watchful eye on your home, especially while you’re away. Indoor models can help you monitor your children and pets, while outdoor models can catch prowlers in the act—and hopefully discourage them from coming around in the first place.

Some models incorporate lights that can illuminate your way. Cameras incorporated into doorbells can monitor your front porch and let you interact with visitors without needing to approach the door—or even be home at the time.

 

 

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Source: TechHive.com

6 Scary Things to Avoid If You’re Trying to Sell Your Home at Halloween

It may sound surprising, but doing Halloween décor right may actually help you sell your home. Doing it wrong—well, we’re terrified just thinking about it. Here’s what not to do when decking out your house for the spooky holiday.

Don’t overdo the exterior
Your home is strung with witch lights, gravestone markers dot your front yard and Casper the Ghost greets visitors at the door? How will potential buyers take your home seriously when your kids insisted on decorating for the holiday.

Don’t go crazy with blood and gore
You may pride yourself on your intricate displays of horror and mayhem, but it’s best to save that for your new place. Sure, your very realistic zombie playground may be a hit with the neighbors every year, but selling your home will require you to keep your professionalism—after all, you’re trying to sell your house, not spook people away from your front lawn. Avoid any cringe-worthy Halloween décor like bloody handprints, tombstones, or morbid scenes.

Don’t lack self-control with the pumpkins
You don’t need your front porch to look like a grocery store display. A tasteful mix of pumpkins and gourds can be inviting. Keep the “tasteful” thing in mind when you’re carving, as well.
Keep an eye on the kids’ carved pumpkins, too. If you don’t want to offend them by hiding the less-than-perfect pumpkins during an open house, you can simply turn the faces toward the wall for showings.

Don’t pack every inch of your interior with Halloween-themed décor
If buyers can’t take their eyes off your (admittedly impressive) skeleton collection, they’re not paying enough attention to your floor plan and features. You want buyers to notice the home, not what’s in it.

Don’t fail to decorate
If you’re in a neighborhood in which every home decorates for Halloween, you don’t want to be the one party pooper—this could make your home stick out for the wrong reason. Save the hanging witches and inflatable Dracula for another time and go for something elegant that speaks to the design sense buyers might find inside.

Don’t price your home too high
This is problematic regardless of the time of year, but fall can be eye-opening for buyers who incorrectly assume that they may be able to command spring or summer home prices without the same competitive conditions. Our competitive market analysis should serve as a guide.

 

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Source: Jaymi Naciri Realty Times

How to Say Goodbye to Renting and Hello to Home Ownership

Becoming a first-time homeowner takes a lot more than a desire to buy a house. It takes a lot of effort on your part to save up a down payment — which is usually a pretty good sized chunk of change — research neighborhoods, get pre-approved for a loan and other steps. Fortunately, it is quite possible to say goodbye to renting and hello to homeownership, especially when homeowners-to-be consider the following tips:

Focus on the Down Payment

In order to leave the land of rent, you are going to need a down payment — plain and simple. While it is common to put down 20 percent, some lenders now allow a much smaller amount, and first-time home buyer programs may go as low as 3 percent. While a smaller down payment may sound enticing, a 5 percent down payment on a $200K home is still $10,000 — not exactly a small sum. If saving money does not come naturally for you, don’t worry. With some relatively minor lifestyle changes you can speed up the down payment savings process. Come up with a savings plan to determine how much you need to set aside every week or month and then find ways to “find” that money in your budget. Using the $10,000 example from before, if you are determined to buy a home in two years, you’ll have to come up with about $415 a month to stash into your down payment account. Take a close look at your monthly bills and determine what you can pare down or eliminate — maybe you are paying $75 a month for a gym membership you rarely use, or you pay $40 extra for premium satellite channels that no one watches. These services can be cancelled and the money can go directly into your savings account. Eat out less, have Starbucks twice a week instead of every day and if you need to, consider a side hustle on the weekends to reach this magical monthly amount of $415.

Avoid Identity Theft

Unfortunately, the chances of becoming a victim of identity theft increase when you are buying and moving into a new home. The stacks of documents that are part of buying a home and that are filled with your personal information may accidentally fall into the wrong hands, and once you move, mail may not be routed correctly and thieves may steal your mail and your identity from your old mailbox. Prevent this situation from happening by purchasing an identity theft protection program; find a trusted company that will help safeguard your personal data. In addition to letting you know when a bank pulls your credit report and asking if you have authorized this inquiry, certain services will monitor your financial activity and alert you if anything is amiss.

Check Your Credit Report

When you start the pre-approval process for a loan and then move on to the Big Kahuna of applying for an actual mortgage, your credit report will be pulled numerous times. Your credit score will then be used to determine if you are approved for a loan, and what type of interest rate you will get. Please do not wait until you have the down payment saved and you are champing at the bit to go look at houses to check your FICO score — check your credit as early in the process as you can. If you have a credit card that has been issued through your bank, give them a call and see if they can run your report for you for free; in the cases of some credit cards, they also offer a free monthly FICO score check. Read through the report and check for any errors; this includes credit lines you never opened and delinquent payments that you know were made on time. Dispute any mistakes that you find and look for ways to boost your credit score, like paying down credit card bills and setting up automatic bill pay so you are never late with your payments.

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Source: Realty Times

Pros and Cons of Buying a Tiny Home

What was once written off as a short-term trend has proven to have staying power. And, tiny homes are no longer being associated primarily with millennials, either. There are plenty of stories of families choosing to live leaner. Tiny homes are now increasingly the choice of seniors, as well. Today’s average tiny house costs about $23,000, and as a result, 68% of all little house owners aren’t tied to a mortgage. Tiny houses can be built on site, or they can be easily shipped to the buyer, thanks to the fact that they will usually fit on a flat-bed truck. More companies that specialize in compact houses are popping up across the country, making it much easier for anyone to go small.

But is the tiny house movement really all it appears to be? As with any new trend, it’s important to seriously consider the pros and cons.

Pro: Yes, they’re affordable

The price is right for tiny homes regardless of location. A tiny house costs a lot less to build than a full-sized one. Cutting back on housing expenses enables tiny house owners to put more money toward other luxuries, save for retirement, or simply work less. A tiny home also often means no mortgage, which, if the buyer can swing it, means they don’t have to pay interest and can own their home outright.

Con: It’s almost impossible to get a mortgage for a tiny home

If you don’t have the money to just pay for a tiny house, getting a loan is challenging. Properties valued at less than $100,000 aren’t generally going to sit well with traditional lenders. Plus, if your tiny house is on wheels, you’ll probably be rejected outright, as homes that aren’t anchored to a foundation aren’t considered real estate.There are alternate routes of financing to explore, like taking out a personal loan or raising all of the capital to build the tiny home yourself, but those can prove more than a little tricky.

If you do succeed in obtaining a personal loan, be aware that the interest rates associated with that loan can be pretty steep, with some as high as 10% to 11% or more. Another option: you might just qualify for an RV loan, if your tiny home is on wheels.

Pro: They’re portable

If you buy a traditional house, you’re not likely going to load it up on a truck and move it somewhere else when you desire a change of scenery. But, with a tiny home, that’s part of the allure. A tiny house can easily be fitted on a flatbed truck, which makes not only delivering them to buyers easy, but also the future resettling as well. Whether you have a lot of wanderlust, seek new job opportunities, or just want to spend a season living close to a beach…it’s easy to appreciate the fact that you can simply pack-up your house and go on your way.

Con: Yes, they’re small!

Technically, this could also be a “pro” for those keen on tightening up their footprint, but, for most people, the idea of living in 100 to 400 square feet (the average size of a tiny home), is a deal-breaker. Living in a tiny home means you’ll have to do a lot of sacrificing in order to downsize, more often than not you’ll have to give up your private office, man cave or home gym. Your washer and dryer will more than likely end up in your bathroom or kitchen and you’ll have to do some serious compromising when it comes to what you bring into the home. There are ways to remedy these ‘sacrifices,’ but you’ll still be giving up your privacy and downsizing no matter how creative you get with storage.”

Pro: It can be anything you want it to be

A tiny house doesn’t have to be a full-time dwelling. Some choose to use a tiny house as a home office, or keep a tidy little place ready for when the in-laws come to visit. Even the federal government knows the value of a tiny home: Dwellings of 308 square feet served as a welcome alternative to FEMA trailers in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

 

Con: Lack of personal space

Forget about that art studio or even a she shed. If you need a little space to yourself, that’s going to be hard to achieve in a tiny home. Living in a tiny home by yourself might be easy, but sharing a small space with one or more people can be a challenge, because there’s no personal space to spend time alone or even roll out an exercise mat and get in a workout. Those of you that are extroverts may have no problem being in tight quarters with others, but introverts may miss the alone time that a larger house can offer.

Pro: They’re clever

You think you have some smart storage solutions in your home? Imagine what you’d need to fashion if you lived in 200 square feet! Look at some uber smart storage under the stairs here and the cabinet walls here.

Con: They still lack storage because they lack space

No matter how many witty ideas you come up with, you’re never going to have an ample walk-in closet and tons of kitchen cabinets—both of which are ingrained in the “typical” vision of the American dream.

Pro: They’re greener

Tiny homes are, by their very essence, more environmentally friendly simply because, it requires substantially fewer building materials to construct, which makes it viable to use more expensive, eco-friendly components and still keep costs down overall. In addition to that solar energy for heating and electricity is something tiny homes are more likely to use than the standard house option.

Buying a tiny house has lots of advantages for free-spirited people with a limited housing budget. But living in a very small sized house is not for everyone. Whatever may be the case, understanding the pros and cons of living in a tiny house can help you make important choices. Here’s to living large — no matter what type of house you choose!

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Source: Realty Times

How to Avoid Disaster on Moving Day

Just like weddings, even a well-planned move can have some hiccups. It can be difficult trying to coordinate the timing of everything: moving help, truck or trailer rental, wait times. Here are four hair-pulling frustrations and solutions on how to avoid these potential moving day disasters.

1. Getting scammed by a moving company

Failed to research your moving company beforehand? You could end up with rogue movers (read: scam artists) and a major moving disaster on your hands. These movers are known for their fraudulent practices, including the lack of a license or insurance. They may also damage or break items, fail to show up on time, and of course (the worst) steal a truckful of your belongings. 

How to avoid: With a growing number of complaints filed against moving companies these days, it’s more important than ever to properly protect yourself and your belongings during a move. So before entrusting your household items to a moving company, be sure to do your homework. To check a moving company’s credibility, make sure they are properly licensed and insured and check for any official complaints filed with the FMCSA.

2. Broken and damaged belongings

Your belongings finally show up at your house – the only problem is they’re broken. Yikes. Unfortunately, this is the fate for many who fail to properly pack their belongings for a move. From shattered glass to damaged furniture, it’s not uncommon for belongings to get banged up during a move – especially when transporting them a long distance.

How to avoid: The best way to avoid ending up with broken belongings is to properly pack your things. For starters, be sure to use appropriate moving boxes and supplies. Don’t use boxes that are damaged or falling apart. For TVs, artwork and mirrors, try using telescope boxes to ensure that they are properly protected. Breakables should be wrapped in bubble wrap, newspaper or foam. Heavy items should be placed in smaller boxes – not larger boxes. It’s important to not place multiple heavy items in one box. Important documents and records should be placed inside file folders before moving. Also, be sure to use waterproof bins and/or plastic baggies to pack electronics and cords.

3. Not being able to fit your couch through the door

Moving day has finally arrived! The only problem is your couch won’t fit through the door. Unfortunately, those with oversized couches and/or a small front door may run into this moving day disaster. Keep in mind, if you have other large furnishings, such as a wide chair, a dining room table or a tall armoire, you could run into a similar problem.

How to avoid: To avoid this frustrating debacle, I highly recommend measuring your couch and doorways prior to the move. If you do have an oversized couch or tiny doorway, try taking the hinges off the door, removing the legs from the couch, or searching your home for another door or window large enough to handle the furniture. Of course, if you hire professional movers for the job, they should be able to handle this sticky situation for you.

4. Your movers refuse to transport your item

You’ve boxed everything up, and you’re ready for the move. Unfortunately, your movers are not allowed to transport your belongings. Why? Because your boxed up things happen to be on their list of “non-allowables.” Uh oh. This means you’ll end up having to find another way to transport your things, and/or you’ll need dispose of them responsibly before moving day.

How to avoid: While most non-allowables are fairly obvious (think: hazardous chemicals), others may not be (think: nail polish and scuba tanks). Other non-allowables include fertilizer, loaded guns, paint, paint thinner, gasoline, propane tanks, and perishable food items – among other things. Be sure to check with your moving company and ask for their full list of non-allowables before packing your belongings.

Overall:

  • Give yourself as much advance time as you can to plan and prepare, especially if you’re doing it yourself. Major moving companies have a lot of useful information on their websites, even for do-it-yourselfers. You’ll also find blogs and books on the subject.

  • Use the most well-recommended company that you can find. This might require some research online and especially through the network of people you know.

Do you need some recommendations for great moving companies? Give us a call at 480-359-6789 and we can hook you up!

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Source: Moving.com