6 Scary Things to Avoid If You’re Trying to Sell Your Home at Halloween

It may sound surprising, but doing Halloween décor right may actually help you sell your home. Doing it wrong—well, we’re terrified just thinking about it. Here’s what not to do when decking out your house for the spooky holiday.

Don’t overdo the exterior
Your home is strung with witch lights, gravestone markers dot your front yard and Casper the Ghost greets visitors at the door? How will potential buyers take your home seriously when your kids insisted on decorating for the holiday.

Don’t go crazy with blood and gore
You may pride yourself on your intricate displays of horror and mayhem, but it’s best to save that for your new place. Sure, your very realistic zombie playground may be a hit with the neighbors every year, but selling your home will require you to keep your professionalism—after all, you’re trying to sell your house, not spook people away from your front lawn. Avoid any cringe-worthy Halloween décor like bloody handprints, tombstones, or morbid scenes.

Don’t lack self-control with the pumpkins
You don’t need your front porch to look like a grocery store display. A tasteful mix of pumpkins and gourds can be inviting. Keep the “tasteful” thing in mind when you’re carving, as well.
Keep an eye on the kids’ carved pumpkins, too. If you don’t want to offend them by hiding the less-than-perfect pumpkins during an open house, you can simply turn the faces toward the wall for showings.

Don’t pack every inch of your interior with Halloween-themed décor
If buyers can’t take their eyes off your (admittedly impressive) skeleton collection, they’re not paying enough attention to your floor plan and features. You want buyers to notice the home, not what’s in it.

Don’t fail to decorate
If you’re in a neighborhood in which every home decorates for Halloween, you don’t want to be the one party pooper—this could make your home stick out for the wrong reason. Save the hanging witches and inflatable Dracula for another time and go for something elegant that speaks to the design sense buyers might find inside.

Don’t price your home too high
This is problematic regardless of the time of year, but fall can be eye-opening for buyers who incorrectly assume that they may be able to command spring or summer home prices without the same competitive conditions. Our competitive market analysis should serve as a guide.

 

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Source: Jaymi Naciri Realty Times

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